Image default
Album Reviews New Releases Reviews

Album Review: Fallen Idol – Mourn the Earth

Fallen Idol is best described as a traditional doom metal band with a slight epic edge. Comparisons could be made to bands like Reverend Bizarre or Candlemass, particularly the latter’s late 2000s stint with Robert Lowe on vocals. The atmosphere is haunting yet playful, the drums are rather basic but executed in a way that helps keep the rhythms and riff work grounded, and the vocals are delivered in a clean yet ominous timbre.

What really sets Mourn the Earth apart from the band’s previous two full-lengths is its more direct approach. The songs are much more hook-based this time around, as a track like the opening “Witches of Lucifer” becomes an instant earworm thanks to its groovy main riff and impish chorus complete with campy female backing. Speaking of vocals, singer/guitarist Rodrigo Sitta retains the theatrical quality of their past albums without sounding so much like he’s aspiring to be Messiah Marcolin.

The other songs also find ways to stand out. “Time to Mourn the Earth” and “Lucidity” come through thanks to their catchy mid-tempo riff sets and slightly busier drum work. I also enjoy how “Shattered Mirror” sets itself as the album’s token speedster before resigning itself to a mournful dirge that almost sounds like classic Burzum, and “The Secret Place” closes the album out with its slowest riff set and most ominous vocal performance.

Mourn the Earth won’t change the doom metal landscape and probably won’t appeal to many listeners outside this niche, but it is one of the better albums in the genre to come out lately. It comes out stronger than Fallen Idol’s other two albums thanks to its emphasis on more memorable songwriting and may be an ideal starting point if you’re interested in checking the band out. Hopefully they’ll be able to get more exposure with this one.

Highlights:
“Witches of Lucifer”
“Time to Mourn the Earth”
“Shattered Mirror”
“The Secret Place”

Related posts

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.